Posts in the category

Babies on my quilts.

I couldn’t resist.  These photos have all shown up in the past couple of days… so it couldn’t be helped. I mean, really, TWO sets of twins!  Oh how I love to see the gifts enjoyed.

Sam & Harry

Fay week 15 136_NEW

Molly&Bridget

Tia over at Camp Follower Baby Lady is organizing a lot of quilts being made for the victims of the fires in Victoria, Australia. It’s such a quick and easy way for us to help out in our own way. She’s having people make wonky stars which I’d never done and is so much fun and a great way to use up scraps! I might have to make more of them…

Stars

Please consider making some yourself ! Just head on over here for more details.

And now you know the name I came up with for the biggest quilt I’ve made!  I think that it’s perfectly fitting because there’s lots of both flora and fauna in the quilt.  And that’s it.  Don’t have to dig too much to get to the meaning! Ha!

Flora & Fauna Quilt

Flora & Fauna Quilt

I have to say… I’m proud of this one.  I think that it’s my favorite quilt that I’ve made.  I put this one together block by block and, to me, it really represents the progress I’ve made in my quilt design. Improvisationally pieced, lots and lots of different fabrics, and a balance with solids. These are all things that I’ve really worked on and have all come together in this one quilt. This one is going to be hard to part with! But it will be very near by and I will visit it often.

A quick mention ’cause the photos aren’t really true… the dark solid is chocolate brown, not black…

Flora & Fauna Quilt

For the back I put together something that worked with the white fabric I had.

Flora & Fauna Quilt - back

This has to be the biggest log cabin block I’ll ever make! It’s huge!

Flora & Fauna Quilt - back detail

This quilt also reminds me how much I enjoy blogging and recording my progress. Back on November 5th of last year I posted this photo of fabric that I had pulled for my next quilt.

The next quilt

And here we are, three months later and (plus or minus some fabrics) it’s finished. I really just find the whole process so rewarding and satisfying. From raw fabric to completed quilt!

Flora & Fauna Quilt detail

Lots of cuddly quilt

Starting new projects

Since I’m stitching on the binding of the huge improv quilt (I’m going to have to come up with a good name for it!) it was time to get started on a couple of new projects!

First, I started some blocks for my mother’s quilt. 6 down, 29 more to go!

Beginnings of Mom's Quilt

I’m really enjoying making these blocks in my usual improv way, but using colors and tones I’m not prone to pick . It’s really fun to be both in my comfort zone and out of it at the same time. If that makes any sense at all…

Otherwise, I’ve officially fallen in love with spiderweb quilts. Ashley who’s in Block Party! with me asked us all to make her two blocks. Didn’t she pick amazing fabrics?!? Who doesn’t love red and aqua.

Block Party - February

After making them I was so taken with both the process and the look, that I knew I had to make a quilt of them for myself.  I actually took the time to sort through all of my scraps before starting.  This block is the perfect way to use up the tiniest bits of fabric!

Spiderwebs

It’s feeling a bit more chaotic than most of my quilts, but I just love it all the same. It takes me about an hour to make one block (I’ve only made four so far!) so this is going to be a long term project. And it’s destined to be a lap quilt I think…

I’ve been using this tutorial if any of you would care to start making some.  But look out!  It’s addictive.  Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

A little close up. I’ll never tire of fussy cutting Heather Ross fabrics.

Spiderwebs close up

Hope that you’ve all had a great weekend!

Quilting

With my new visitors from Sew, Mama, Sew! I have been getting the same question quite a bit:  How do you do that “all over squiggly” quilting?  I do it on my normal little sewing machine, and you can do it too!  It’s called free motion quilting – and that pattern is called stippling.  I’m certainly no expert, and there’s lots of other info out there about free motion quilting, but I thought I’d type up a post, with all my thoughts and tips, to direct people to.

Quilting

First off, I want to mention that it’s not that hard. I feel like before I did any free motion quilting, everything I read about it scared me off. People made it sound like it was incredibly tough to master.  But it’s not.  It takes practice, but beyond that, it’s something that anyone can do.

The nuts and bolts: you use a darning foot on your machine, and you put your feed dogs down.  From there, practice lots on quilt sandwich scraps before diving into your first quilt top.

Other things that help:

- Always set your needle to stop in the down position so that you can stop and start as much as you need to.
-The key to even stitches is to find the balance between the speed you move the quilt and the speed of your needle.
- For me, going fast makes my stitches more even – but from what I’ve read that’s not the case for everyone.
- If you run out of thread in your bobbin in the middle of your quilt, just keep going from the same spot, making sure to sew a few locking stitches over where you left off.
- I check that the back of the quilt looks right A LOT. Tension problems often don’t show on the front.
- If you’re quilting a big quilt, having a table to your left to hold the weight of the quilt is incredibly helpful. You can see what I mean in this photo.

Quilting

Beyond all that I’ve mentioned, there is an amazing flickr discussion here that gives you all the tips and tricks you could ever need. And Amanda Jean put up a GREAT video tutorial here. Both of those helped me a lot.

The other question that I’m often asked is how I organize my quilting… meaning, where on the quilt do I start and how do  I work my way through the quilt.  I have an incredibly tough time explaining it in words, so I did a drawing for you! Here it is:

How I Quilt

I hope that’s clear! I don’t start in the middle as is often suggested, but this seems to work for me. The first couple of quilts I stippled would get some yucky puckering in the back but now I pin LIKE CRAZY (I mean, I think I might OVER pin!) when I’m basting and that problem has stopped.

Quilting has come to be my favorite step of quilt making. I still get a thrill every time I sew over a seam and “unite” the quilt top a bit more. I love watching it all come together. It’s so much fun!